Tag Archives: southeast alaska

the ubiquitous lysichiton americanus

‘In the ancient days they say there was no salmon. The Indians had nothing to eat save roots and leaves. Principle among there was the skunk cabbage. Finally, the spring salmon came for the first time. As they passed up the river, a person stood upon the shore and shouted, “Here come our relatives whose bodies are full of eggs!

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lichtenstadter and mount andrew mine kasaan peninsula

Lichtenstadter and the Mount Andrew Mine Abundant natural resources have attracted prehistoric native peoples, European explorers/traders, and Americans to Prince of Wales Island. The Island’s has a long history of natural resource development. Mining has been an important part of that history. This blog continues our series of blogs about mining on the Kasaan Peninsula. One of the principal mines

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the “official” herald of spring

The vernal equinox occurred two weeks ago (March 20th) by the calendar and two days ago we heard a flock of geese pass by during the early morning. But now, spring “officially” has arrived at our Setter Lake – the yellow skunk cabbage (Lysichitum americanum) shoots are emerging from the lake edge’s soggy, organic soil. Alas, the deer are relived

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nothin’ common about the common thrush

In June 1853, Thoreau wrote of an enchanting encounter with the Wood Thrush: “This is the only bird whose note affects me like music. It lifts and exhilarates me. It is inspiring. It changes all hours to an eternal morning.” http://birdnote.org/show/henry-david-thoreau-and-wood-thrush Hear! Hear! David Thoreau’s poignant prose about the elusive common thrush resonates with anyone who hears the morning trill

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bear bread…anyone?

Found throughout Southeast Alaska, bear bread or conk, is a familiar sight on tree stumps, dead trees, downed trees, even firewood.  They are a the spore producing fruiting portion of the fungus, its main body called the mycelium are stringy filaments that burrow into the tree contributing primarily to its decay by absorbing nutrients, breaking down the structure, etc. Some

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